Texe Marrs’ DNA Science and the Jewish Bloodline

Texe Marrs' DNA Science and the Jewish Bloodline

Texe Marrs’ DNA Science and the Jewish Bloodline

Who are the Jews? What is their ancestry? Are the Jews a homogenous race? Are Jews descended from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob?

Today, DNA science reveals that almost all the Jews in the world come from Khazaria. They are not of the blood lineage of Abraham and the prophets, but of King Bulan and the pagan peoples of the Caucasus. The ancestors of today’s Jews are not Israelites but are Khazarians.

Khazaria’s people, in the 8th century, converted from paganism to Judaism. In the 10th century, these Khazarian “Jewish” converts emigrated to Eastern Europe, and especially Poland and Lithuania.

In 1948, the Khazars, erroneously believing themselves to be “Jews,” arrived in the territory of Palestine and set up the state of Israel. The people of Israel today are virtually all of Khazar (Turk/Mongol stock) extraction. The “Jews” have no genetic claims to the land of Israel and no family connection whatsoever to historical Israel.

DNA science joins recent discoveries in history and archaeology to present the world with a correct and remarkable picture of the Jewish people. Now, everything changes!

2013 is the year every body can claim “Jews are not Israelites we have free scientific evidence”!

DNA Science and the Jewish Bloodline by Texe Marrs is based on historical facts and the recent (re)confirmation that Ashkenazi Jews are Khazars (an Asian race of Turkic-Mongolic origins).

Why is it so important? Ashkenazi Jews, the Khazarian Jews, are now comprising for about 95% of the current jewish population after they almost wipped out relatively important Sephardim and Mizrahim Jew communities.

If you want to grasp why the USA, the UK, the EU, Japan and the rest of the world is slipping into nightmare you must look at who’s in charge.
Either a Jew or a free-mason “goy” is always in charge of society’s, company’s, NGO’s, etc, department that is f importance (PR, finance, research…). All have been infiltrated. Get ready to stand up!

Genome Biology and Evolution Advance Access published December 14, 2012 doi:10.1093/gbe/evs119
Research Article
The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses
Eran Elhaik

Quoting the Zionist’s Wikipedia articles as of 23rd September 2013:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khazars#Ashkenazi-Khazar%20theories

Ashkenazi-Khazar theories

Several scholars have suggested that the Khazars did not disappear after the dissolution of their Empire, but migrated West to eventually form part of the core of the later Ashkenazi Jewish population of Europe. This hypothesis is greeted with scepticism or caution by most scholars.[211][212]

Abraham Eliyahu Harkavi suggested as early as 1869 that there might be a link between the Khazars and European Jews[213] but the theory that Khazar converts formed a major proportion of Ashkenazi was first proposed to a Western public in a lecture by Ernest Renan in 1883.[214][215] Occasional suggestions emerged that there was a small Khazar component in East European Jews in works by Joseph Jacobs (1886), Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu, a critic of anti-Semitism, (1893)[216] Maksymilian Ernest Gumplowicz,[217] and by the Russian-Jewish anthropologist Samuel Weissenberg.[218] In 1909 Hugo von Kutschera developed the notion into a book-length study,[219] arguing Khazars formed the foundational core of the modern Ashkenazi.[220] Maurice Fishberg introduced the notion to an American audience in 1911.[221] The idea was also taken up by the Polish-Jewish economic historian and General Zionist Yitzhak Schipper in 1918[222][223] and by scholarly anthropologists, such as Roland B. Dixon (1923), and by writers like H. G. Wells (1921) who used it to argue that “The main part of Jewry never was in Judea”,[224][225] a thesis that was to have a political echo in later opinion.[226][227] In 1932, Samuel Krauss ventured the theory that the biblical Ashkenaz referred to northern Asia Minor, and identified it with the Khazars, a position immediately disputed by Jacob Mann.[228] Ten years later, in 1942, Abraham N. Poliak, later professor for the history of the Middle Ages at Tel Aviv University, published a Hebrew monograph in which he concluded that the East European Jews came from Khazaria.[229][230] D.M. Dunlop, writing in 1954, thought very little evidence backed what he regarded as a mere assumption, and argued that the Ashkenazi-Khazar descent theory went far beyond what our imperfect records permit.[231] Poliak’s work found some support in Salo Wittmayer Baron and Ben-Zion Dinur,[232][233] but was dismissed by Bernard Weinryb as a fiction (1962).[234]

The Khazar-Ashkenazi hypothesis came to the attention of a much wider public with the publication of Arthur Koestler’s The Thirteenth Tribe in 1976.[235] which was both positively reviewed and dismissed as a fantasy, and a somewhat dangerous one. Israel’s ambassador to Britain branded it ‘an anti-Semitic action financed by the Palestinians,’ while Bernard Lewis claimed that the idea was not supported by any evidence whatsoever, and had been abandoned by all serious scholars.[235][236] Raphael Patai, however, registered some support for the idea that Khazar remnants had played a role in the growth of Eastern European Jewish communities,[237] and several amateur researchers, such as Boris Altschüler (1994)[238] and Kevin Alan Brook,[239] kept the thesis in the public eye. The theory has been occasionally manipulated to deny Jewish nationhood.[235][240] Recently, a variety of approaches, from linguistics (Paul Wexler)[241] to historiography (Shlomo Sand)[242] and population genetics (Eran Elhaik)[243] has revived support for and interest in the theory. In broad academic perspective, both the idea that the Khazars converted en masse to Judaism, and the suggestion they emigrated to form the core population of Ashkenazi Jewry, remain highly polemical issues.[244]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thirteenth_Tribe

Genetic research

A 2005 study by Nebel et al., based on Y chromosome polymorphic markers, showed that Ashkenazi Jews are more closely related to other Jewish and Middle Eastern groups than to the populations among whom they lived in Europe. However, 11.5% of male Ashkenazim were found to belong to Haplogroup R1a, the dominant Y chromosome haplogroup in Eastern Europeans, suggesting possible gene flow. Referencing The Thirteenth Tribe, the study’s authors note that “Some authors argue that after the fall of their kingdom in the second half of the 10th century CE, the Khazar converts were absorbed by the emerging Ashkenazi Jewish community in Eastern Europe.” They conclude: “However, if the R-M17 chromosomes in Ashkenazi Jews do indeed represent the vestiges of the mysterious Khazars then, according to our data, this contribution was limited to either a single founder or a few closely related men, and does not exceed ~ 12% of the present-day Ashkenazim”.[24]

Writing in Science, Michael Balter states Koestler’s thesis “clash[es] with several recent studies suggesting that Jewishness, including the Ashkenazi version, has deep genetic roots.” He refers to a 2010 study by geneticist Harry Ostrer which found that Ashkenazi Jews “clustered more closely with Middle Eastern and Sephardic Jews, a finding the researchers say is inconsistent with the Khazar hypothesis” and concludes “that all three Jewish groups—Middle Eastern, Sephardic, and Ashkenazi—share genomewide genetic markers that distinguish them from other worldwide populations”. Geneticist Noah Rosenberg asserts that although recent DNA studies “do not appear to support” the Khazar hypothesis, they do not “entirely eliminate it either.”[25]

In contrast, an analysis of DNA evidence published in late 2012 by the journal ‘Genome Biology and Evolution’ supported the thesis that present-day Jews are, according to geneticist Eran Elhaik, “primarily the children of a Turkish people who lived in what is now Russia, north of Georgia, east of Ukraine … the Khazars.”[26]
External links

The Thirteenth Tribe by Arthur Koestler, located on Archive.org The Internet Archive, accessed 6 June 2012.
The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses by Eran Elhaik, accessed 20 April 2013.
Highlight: Out of Khazaria—Evidence for “Jewish Genome” Lacking by Danielle Venton, accessed 27 May 2013.

Learn more:

http://www.realzionistnews.com/?p=457 Zionist Jewish Mind Control – A Case Study
http://www.anglo-saxonisrael.com/content/israels-migrations-series
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genographic_Project
THE REAL HOLOCAUST General Eisenhower’s Zionist War Crimes Against Germany http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5kqYToKXTY

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